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Pupil Premium

Pupil premium

 

Introduced in 2011, the pupil premium is a sum of money given to schools each year by the Government to improve the attainment of children from families who are eligible for free school meals. Your child will qualify for the pupil premium fund if they have received free school meals at some point over the last 6 years.

 

This gives us a great opportunity to support your child in many different ways.

 

If your child qualifies for the Pupil premium fund, you will have received a letter asking for suggestions for how you think the fund could support your child. A copy of this letter can be found below. Please consider your child’s strengths and the things they find difficult when considering support. They may have a sporting talent that we can help promote, a musical talent that you wish they could follow or it may be that you need help with trips and uniform.

 

In addition to this, we are also offering parents a £200 budget which can be used towards school uniform, trips, clubs etc.

 

If you have any suggestions or ideas of how we can support your child, please contact Sarah Filsell who is the Pupil premium co-ordinator or complete the slip on the letter below.

Alternatively, if you want to allocate some of your £200 budget, then please contact Sarah Kennedy in the office.

Pupil Premium letter Sep 2016

Pupil Premium Contact Form

If you would prefer to contact me via the website, I will get back to you as soon as I can.

Pupil Premium Provision 2018-19

 

In 2018-2019, the school will receive £53 100 of pupil premium monies. The school is planning to use it in the following ways:

 

1.   One to one and small group tuition delivered by teachers & learning support assistants within and beyond the school day with a continued focus on maths: £24, 057

 

2. Support and intervention including continued advice, training and specialist teacher sessions from the Specialist Teaching Service and educational psychologist (to include bespoke assessments and therapies based on individual need): £1 643

 

4. Continued employment of school social worker (Faith in Families) to support the well-being of pupils & their families: £10 200

 

5. Purchase of resources to support learning: £1 000

 

6. Accelerated reader Software to support reluctant readers: £4 300

 

7. Run lunchtime club to support children socially and emotionally at lunchtimes: £5700

 

8. Engaging parents further to support financially. Parents will be given their own budget to influence spending. This may be used for: school clubs, musical instrument lessons, activities, transport, trips, visitors to school and Y6 residential for eligible families up to £200 per child: £6 200

Evaluation of the Pupil Premium Strategy for 2017-2018
 

In 2017-2018, the school received £58 340 of pupil premium monies. The school used it in the following ways:

 

1.One to one and small group tuition delivered by teachers & learning support assistants within and beyond the school day with a particular focus on maths: £34, 284

Impact:
There were 13 children in Y6 who were entitled to pupil premium, 3 of these arrived part way through year 5 and so the school did not much time to boost their skills. Progress for the Y6 pupil premium children was at least in line with national progress for all children and above national in writing. This was even better without the three later arrivals.

The school has also had a focus on increasing the number of pupil premium children who at attain at the higher standard. In 2017-2018, 2 children attained at the higher standard in writing and one in reading. One pupil was on track in maths but underperformed on the day of the maths test. Maths still continues to be an area that we would like to do even better in.

 

Across all year groups, teaching assistants were deployed to use afternoons to undertake small interventions based on the morning work and gaps in the learning giving PP children a priority. The TAs were also responsible for getting the children to undertake the quizzes in Accelerated Reader and moving the children onto the next book, encouraging and praising to raise self-esteem.

 

 

2. Continued advice, training and specialist teacher sessions from the Specialist Teaching Service and educational psychologist (to include bespoke assessments and therapies based on individual need): £2000

 

Impact: professional assessments, attendance of pupils at school-based therapy groups, advice to staff and parents have supported and enabled the school to improve the personalisation of learning for individuals. This year, educational psychologists have supported two children in key stage 1 with emotional and behavioural support and two children in year 6 with their transition to secondary school. Their advice and guidance have enabled pupils to move forward at a faster rate and increase confidence. Children in key stage 1 have also benefitted from advice and support from Autism Outreach and Birchwood Outreach. Four children have received support from outside professionals and two of these children were eligible for Pupil Premium

 

3.Training for learning support staff: £1000

 

Impact: All staff received training from the Autism Outreach Service this year. Staff included all teaching staff plus support staff, office staff and lunchtime supervisors. The training consisted of two parts: Tier 1- Making sense of Autism and Tier 2- Good Autism Practice. Training gave staff an excellent understanding of Autism and then gave them the opportunity to explore hands-on techniques in the classroom. As well as this, six teaching staff and two support staff received Positive Handling training which taught staff to safely hold people at risk of harming themselves or others, manage challenging behaviour and diffuse conflict. Following this training, staff felt that they had a deeper confidence and understanding of how to ensure the children have an even more positive learning experience whatever their needs.

We also organised training for support staff to undertake training for benchmarking and inference in
reading. Both of these interventions impacted on the progress of pupils especially in Y2 and Y6.

 

4. Continued employment of school social worker (Faith in Families) to support the well-being of pupils & their families: £10 149

Impact: Pupils with significant barriers to learning have really benefited from this service. This year, 18 children have worked with Faith in Families and 7 of these children were pupil premium. The main referral types were: support with behaviour at home and at school, self-esteem, family issues, bereavement and anxiety, often a number of these occured in one referral.

 

 

Faith in Families also ran two Theraplay groups, a bereavement group, which was initiated by a child, and a lunch time drop-in group. over the year. Group Theraplay is a therapist-guided therapy for children that enhance attachment, self-esteem and trust in others through play and interaction. It is based on the natural qualities found in healthy parent and child relationships, and focuses on four domains: structure, nurture, engagement, and challenge. This process helps children to view themselves as worthy and lovable, and change their perceptions of relationships to ones that are positive and rewarding. The Year 6 group consisted of 6 children and 4 of these children were eligible for pupil premium. The Year 5 group consisted of 6 children and 3 of these children were eligible for pupil premium.

It has been highly valued by staff, pupils and parents. Sample comments include:

 

Young People’s Feedback Comments:

 

“It was great to work with you and Jo in the Theraplay Group”

 

“I want to speak to you (Leroy) as you understand me and you are fair”

 

“Thanks for spending time with me I really enjoy talking things out with you”

 

“You make me laugh all the time and make me feel good”

 

“I would like to do another group with you, just any group will do”

 

“It was great to know you”

 

“Please attend my liturgy service as it would mean a lot if you come”

 

 

Parent feedback Comments:

 

“I would never have thought you would have got him to talk so easily, thanks Leroy”

 

“Wish there was a Leroy in the house as he listens to you”

 

“Thanks for the help and advice you gave me to try and turn things around”

 

“Thanks for telling me exactly how it is as that is the way I like to be told you’re a straight talker Leroy”

 

“I can tell my son likes you as he always talks about what he did with you on the way home”

 

“Thank so much for all your help Leroy and pleased I met you”

 

 

Teaching Staff Feedback Comments:

 

“The Children relate to him really well and feel at ease with him.”

 

“He notices little things about children that make a difference to their daily lives.”

 

“He gets to know our children and families and does everything he can to support them.”

 

He is so approachable and supportive and has a fantastic rapport with both the children and staff. We feel he is genuinely interested and concerned for us.”

 

“He is very approachable by both children and adults; children find him a support and look forward to their sessions.”

 

 

5. Purchase of resources to support learning: £1 000

Resources were purchased for the new lunchtime pyramid club (see bullet 7). This ensured the children’s interest was kept up. It also provided a great opportunity to develop social skills such as, sharing, taking-turns and waiting, and also develop speech and language, broadening vocabulary.

The school also purchased a number of new books for the library to support the Accelerated Reading intervention and ensure there were lots of books of interest.

 

6. Accelerated reader intervention to support reluctant readers: £1520

Pupils, particularly in Y3 & 4 increased the number of books they were reading and became more engaged in wanting to read, often initiating a quiz and change of book. Overall progress was very pleasing with 17 pupils out of 21 achieving expected or better progress in reading and 8 out of 21 making above expected progress.

 

7. Set up lunchtime club to support children socially and emotionally at lunchtimes: £5700

 

Impact: Pyramid club began in October 2017 as a social group for children who may be finding play difficult. Teachers chose one member of their class who they felt may benefit from structured play activities at lunchtimes. The child chosen was then able to choose a friend to attend the club with them. The aim of the club was to give children the opportunity to play with other children and learn how to socialize in a safe and happy environment. Over the year, most children attended the club. All of the children eligible for pupil premium attended the club and were considered a high priority for teachers when selecting children. Three children eligible for pupil premium attended the club regularly both as helpers and as attendees. The club was a great success and two children in particular who had been struggling with their behaviour at lunchtimes managed to have successful relationships which then continued into the classroom in the afternoons.

 

8. Engaging parents further to support financially. Parents will be given their own budget to influence spending. This may be used for: school clubs, musical instrument lessons, activities, transport, trips, visitors to school and Y6 residential for eligible families up to £200 per child: £7400

 

Impact: This year, parents of PP pupils have benefitted from financial support including access to a broader range of enrichment activities such as before/after school clubs, musical instrument tuition, school uniform, school trips and the Y6 residential.

 

Pupil Premium Impact 2016-2017

In 2016-2017, the school received £59 080 of pupil premium monies. The school used it in the following ways:

1. One to one and small group tuition delivered by teachers & learning support assistants within and beyond the school day: £29 681

 

Impact:

KS1: All pupil premium children achieved the standard in the phonics screening assessment in Year 1 & Year 2. In Year 2, all pupil premium pupils achieved the standards in reading, writing and maths.

 

Year 6: The 12 pupil premium children who have been at Bishop Ellis since KS1 made good progress across all subjects. New progress indicators are given by a progress residual, with zero indicating progress is exactly in line with national. Floor standards are: minus 5 in reading, minus 5 in maths and minus 7 in writing.

Progress in reading and maths shows PP pupils performed similarly to other pupils nationally (pupil who are not pupil premium) with progress of +0.56 and -0.37 respectively. Writing progress was particularly strong with pupils showing an average progress of +3.74. Four of the pupil premium children also have a diagnosis of dyslexia and despite this made above average progress in writing. 

 

2. Continued advice, training and specialist teacher sessions from the Specialist Teaching Service and educational psychologist (to include bespoke assessments and therapies based on individual need): £2 000

 

Impact: assessments, groups, advice and support has enabled the school to improve the personalisation of learning for individuals. This year, educational psychologists have supported a child with behavioural and emotional needs. They have also supported a Year 6 child with transition to secondary school. Their advice and guidance have enabled pupils to move forward at a faster rate and increase confidence.

The specialist teaching service has supported a dyslexic child with a diagnosis and given further advice to teachers. Four children have received support from outside professionals and three of these children were eligible for Pupil Premium.

 

3. Training for learning support staff: £500
 

Impact:

Draw and Talk was introduced by Ann Matthews from the Educational Psychologist team to train our support staff. This intervention enabled support staff to work one to one with children struggling with anxiety or transition in their lives.

Twenty children received Draw and Talk sessions last year and 16 of these children were Pupil Premium children. All staff formed strong relationships with the child they were working with and gained a good understanding of children’s needs and how to address them in school.

Staff commented;

“You see a side of a child that you don’t normally see”

“They always have a great big smile during the sessions”

“Colours used at the beginning were dark but now are getting brighter”


4. Continued employment of school social worker (Faith in Families) to support the well-being of pupils & their families: £10 000

                

Impact: Pupils with significant barriers to learning have really benefited from this service. This year, 15 children have worked with Faith in Families and 11 of these children were Pupil Premium. It has been highly valued by staff, pupils and parents.

 

Children commented:

“Liz is helping me to be happy and not sad”

“It’s helped a lot, in trying to forget about the sad feelings”

“I feel more confident and less anxious”

“It’s helped all the times I’ve been seeing Liz because I’m having a hard time”

“Before I saw Liz, I used to not want to come school”

“I get advice for when I’m angry and calm down”


5. Purchase of resources to support learning; in particular reading books and maths: £1 000

 

Impact: pupils have more choice of books and so enjoyment and productivity has increased (see next bullet). Maths resources have supported pupils well in interventions and classes.

 

6. Purchase of ICT equipment & software to support learning: £3633.

 

Impact: The school has continued subscriptions to our successful English and Maths websites, which have continued to aid learning at home. We have also continued to subscribe to our online accelerated reader website, which is continuing to be very successful especially with some of our more reluctant readers or with pupils who need further guidance on understanding the content of reading books.
 

Progress was particularly good in Years 3 and 4 where 38 children took part.  All of the Pupil premium children took part in the Accelerated Reading programme and made over a year’s progress on average in just under 9 months. One child actually made over two years progress and all staff noticed an increased love of reading and an improvement in the amount of reading taking place outside of school.

 

7. Engaging parents further to support financially. Parents will be given their own budget to influence spending. This may be used for: school clubs, musical instrument lessons, activities, transport, trips, visitors to school and Y6 residential for low income families up to £200 per child: £4 587

 

Impact: This year, parents of PP pupils have benefitted from financial support including access to a broader range of enrichment activities such as musical instrument tuition, school uniform and the Y6 residential.

 

8. Introduce Sound Training for Y5/6 pupils to boost the literacy skills and vocabulary knowledge: £6 160

 

Sound training promotes reading for knowledge, fluency of decoding and word mastery through specific targeted instructions and activities. It focuses on the structure of the English language and improves the reading ages of the children taking part.

 

Impact: 21 Year 5/6 Pupil Premium children took part in the training. 9 of these children made accelerated progress and 9 children made good progress. Writing and spelling was also positively affected by the Sound Training, with writing for PP children who completed Sound Training making fast progress over the year.

 

9. Take part in the Achievement for All project, a flagship programme that has been shown to close the achievement gap between children deemed vulnerable to underachievement: £0.

 

Impact: We were unfortunately unsuccessful in our bid to take part in the Achievement for All project so the £3000 has been used to extend support teaching interventions such as the Sound Training.

Pupil Premium Impact 2015-2016 
 

In 2015-2016, the school received £74 810 of pupil premium monies. It is being used to support children in the following ways:

1. One to one and small group tuition delivered by teachers & learning support assistants within and beyond the school day; £48 888           
Impact: 

KS1: All pupil premium children achieved the standard in the phonics screening assessment in Year 1 & Year 2.
In Year 2, pupil premium pupils, without special needs, achieved the standards in reading, writing and maths. Both SEN pupils made similar progress to other children in the school with a similar starting point.
National comparisons are not currently available.


Year 6:  PP children made good progress across all subjects.
New progress indicators are given by a progress residual, with zero indicating progress is exactly in line with national. Floor standards are: minus 5 in reading, minus 5 in maths and minus 7 in writing.


Progress in reading from the new reading test shows PP pupils performed in line with all pupils nationally (-0.1). This means our PP pupils performed similarly to all pupils nationally. Writing and maths: residuals show average progress was high against all pupils nationally (writing: +2.4; maths: +1.63). This shows our PP pupils performed well above all pupils nationally.


No formal national data is available yet to compare with other schools’ PP pupils. OFSTED’s analysis to follow.

 

2. Advice, training and specialist teacher sessions from the Specialist Teaching Service and educational psychologist (to include bespoke assessments and therapies based on individual need); £2 955

Impact: assessments, groups, advice and support has enabled the school to improve the personalisation of learning for individuals. Learning sessions for individual children and training for support staff, which has been disseminated to colleagues has enabled pupils who were stuck or slow in their learning to move forward at a faster rate and increase confidence.

 

3. Training for learning support staff; £500


Impact: improved understanding of children' needs and how to address them has improved the quality of provision in the classes, both emotionally & academically.
 

4. Employment of school social worker (Faith in Families) to support the well-being of pupils & their families;   £9 029


Impact: pupils with significant barriers to learning have really benefitted from this service. It has been highly valued by staff, pupils and parents.
 

5. Purchase of resources to support learning; in particular reading books and maths practical materials; £2 060

 

Impact: pupils have more choice of books and so enjoyment and productivity has increased (see next bullet). Maths resources have support pupils well in interventions and classes.


6. Purchase of ICT equipment & software to support learning; £8 021
 

Impact: The school has continued subscriptions to our successful English and Maths websites, which have continued to aid learning at home; it has also subscribed to an online accelerated reader website, which has started to impact very successful on reluctant readers or pupils who need further guidance on challenging the content of reading books. There has been a good increase in the love for reading and the amount of reading taking place outside of school.

Some further hardware has been purchased (interactive whiteboards for the new intervention mobiles & tablets), which has enabled pupils to have more frequent access to the Internet both at home and in school, particularly to use with Accelerated Reader and mobile interventions.
 

7. Subsidising the cost of: school clubs, enrichment activities (Forest Schools), musical instrument lessons, activities, transport, trips, visitors to school and Y6 residential for low income families. £3 582 

 

Impact: all parents were offered a one to one meeting with the inclusion manager to gauge how their child/children might be better supported. Parents of PP pupils have benefitted from financial support including access to a broader range of enrichment activities such as musical instrument tuition, Y6 residential and activity clubs. 

Pupil Premium Impact 2014-2015

 

In 2014-2015, the school received £72 258 of pupil premium monies. It was used to support children in the following ways:

 

  • One to one and small group tuition delivered by teachers & learning support assistants within and beyond the school day; employment of extra teacher time and learning support hours. Focus on teaching to gaps and giving feedback to move learning forward. (£47 000)

 

Impact on standards:

 

All disadvantaged children achieved the standard in the phonics screening assessment in Year 1 & Year 2;
Attainment overall for disadvantaged children in Year 2 was in line with disadvantaged children nationally and was similar to other pupils in the school in maths and at least the same or better compared to national attainment.

 

OFSTED’s analysis of data shows that outcomes for disadvantaged children at the end of Key Stage 2 is a strength of the school. Value added by the school in all subjects was at least average or better for disadvantaged pupils. Furthermore the progress made by disadvantaged children in reading, writing and maths was similar to the progress of other pupils nationally for at least 80% of the children.

 

  • Advice, training and specialist teacher sessions from the Specialist Teaching Service and educational psychologist; (£5000)

 

Impact: advice and support has enabled the school to improve the personalisation of learning for individuals. Learning sessions for individual children and training for support staff, which has been disseminated to colleagues has enabled pupils who were stuck or slow in their learning to move forward at a faster rate.

 

  • Overtime for support staff to attend training outside school hours; (£500)

 

Impact: improved understanding of children’ needs and how to address them has improved the quality of provision in the classes, both emotionally & academically.

 

  • Employment of school social worker (Faith in Families) to support the well being of pupils & their families; (£10 000)

Impact: this continues to be an invaluable resource. Feedback from families and the children is highly positive. Children are becoming more resilient and more able to apply coping strategies in difficult situations.

 

  • Purchase of ICT equipment & software to support learning; (£1 500)

 

Impact: Pupils have had an increased number of opportunities to use ICT for learning (including I-Pads/Kindles) both at school and at home. This motivational approach has enabled children to increase the pace of their progress.

 

  • Subsidising the cost of: school clubs, musical instrument lessons, activities, transport, trips, visitors to school and Y6 residential for low income families. (£8 750)

 

Impact: Pupils across the school have had opportunities to improve health and fitness and broaden their life experiences. This has also raised confidence and self-esteem for some pupils. Support with transport for some pupils has improved attendance and minimised gaps in learning.

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