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Pupil Premium

Pupil premium

 

Introduced in 2011, the pupil premium is a sum of money given to schools each year by the Government to improve the attainment of children from families who are eligible for free school meals. Your child will qualify for the pupil premium fund if they have received free school meals at some point over the last 6 years.

 

This gives us a great opportunity to support your child in many different ways.

 

If your child qualifies for the Pupil premium fund, you will have received a letter asking for suggestions for how you think the fund could support your child. A copy of this letter can be found below. Please consider your child’s strengths and the things they find difficult when considering support. They may have a sporting talent that we can help promote, a musical talent that you wish they could follow or it may be that you need help with trips and uniform.

 

In addition to this, we are also offering parents a £200 budget which can be used towards school uniform, trips, clubs etc.

 

If you have any suggestions or ideas of how we can support your child, please contact Sarah Filsell who is the Pupil premium co-ordinator or complete the slip on the letter below.

Alternatively, if you want to allocate some of your £200 budget, then please contact Sarah Kennedy in the office.

Pupil Premium letter Sep 2016

Pupil Premium Contact Form

If you would prefer to contact me via the website, I will get back to you as soon as I can.

Pupil Premium Provision 2016-2017
In 2016-2017, the school will receive £59 080 of pupil premium monies. The school is planning to use it in the following ways:

1.    One to one and small group tuition delivered by teachers & learning support assistants within and beyond the school day; £26 565


2.    Continued advice, training and specialist teacher sessions from the Specialist Teaching Service and educational psychologist (to include bespoke assessments and therapies based on individual need); £2 000

3.    Training for learning support staff; £500


4.    Continued employment of school social worker (Faith in Families) to support the well-being of pupils & their families;  £10 000


5.    Purchase of resources to support learning; in particular reading books and maths; £1 000

6.    Purchase of ICT equipment & software to support learning; £4000.


7.    Engaging parents further to support financially. Parents will be given their own budget to influence spending. This may be used for: school clubs, musical instrument lessons, activities, transport, trips, visitors to school and Y6 residential for low income families up to £200 per child; £11 600
 

8.    Introduce Sound Training for Y5/6 pupils to boost the literacy skills and vocabulary knowledge; £1 500 
 

9.    Take part in the Achievement for All project, a flagship programme that has been shown to close the achievement gap between children deemed vulnerable to underachievement; £3 000.

Pupil Premium Impact 2015-2016 
 

In 2015-2016, the school received £74 810 of pupil premium monies. It is being used to support children in the following ways:

1. One to one and small group tuition delivered by teachers & learning support assistants within and beyond the school day; £48 888           
Impact: 

KS1: All pupil premium children achieved the standard in the phonics screening assessment in Year 1 & Year 2.
In Year 2, pupil premium pupils, without special needs, achieved the standards in reading, writing and maths. Both SEN pupils made similar progress to other children in the school with a similar starting point.
National comparisons are not currently available.


Year 6:  PP children made good progress across all subjects.
New progress indicators are given by a progress residual, with zero indicating progress is exactly in line with national. Floor standards are: minus 5 in reading, minus 5 in maths and minus 7 in writing.


Progress in reading from the new reading test shows PP pupils performed in line with all pupils nationally (-0.1). This means our PP pupils performed similarly to all pupils nationally. Writing and maths: residuals show average progress was high against all pupils nationally (writing: +2.4; maths: +1.63). This shows our PP pupils performed well above all pupils nationally.


No formal national data is available yet to compare with other schools’ PP pupils. OFSTED’s analysis to follow.

 

2. Advice, training and specialist teacher sessions from the Specialist Teaching Service and educational psychologist (to include bespoke assessments and therapies based on individual need); £2 955

Impact: assessments, groups, advice and support has enabled the school to improve the personalisation of learning for individuals. Learning sessions for individual children and training for support staff, which has been disseminated to colleagues has enabled pupils who were stuck or slow in their learning to move forward at a faster rate and increase confidence.

 

3. Training for learning support staff; £500


Impact: improved understanding of children' needs and how to address them has improved the quality of provision in the classes, both emotionally & academically.
 

4. Employment of school social worker (Faith in Families) to support the well-being of pupils & their families;   £9 029


Impact: pupils with significant barriers to learning have really benefitted from this service. It has been highly valued by staff, pupils and parents.
 

5. Purchase of resources to support learning; in particular reading books and maths practical materials; £2 060

 

Impact: pupils have more choice of books and so enjoyment and productivity has increased (see next bullet). Maths resources have support pupils well in interventions and classes.


6. Purchase of ICT equipment & software to support learning; £8 021
 

Impact: The school has continued subscriptions to our successful English and Maths websites, which have continued to aid learning at home; it has also subscribed to an online accelerated reader website, which has started to impact very successful on reluctant readers or pupils who need further guidance on challenging the content of reading books. There has been a good increase in the love for reading and the amount of reading taking place outside of school.

Some further hardware has been purchased (interactive whiteboards for the new intervention mobiles & tablets), which has enabled pupils to have more frequent access to the Internet both at home and in school, particularly to use with Accelerated Reader and mobile interventions.
 

7. Subsidising the cost of: school clubs, enrichment activities (Forest Schools), musical instrument lessons, activities, transport, trips, visitors to school and Y6 residential for low income families. £3 582 

 

Impact: all parents were offered a one to one meeting with the inclusion manager to gauge how their child/children might be better supported. Parents of PP pupils have benefitted from financial support including access to a broader range of enrichment activities such as musical instrument tuition, Y6 residential and activity clubs. 

Pupil Premium Impact 2014-2015

 

In 2014-2015, the school received £72 258 of pupil premium monies. It was used to support children in the following ways:

 

  • One to one and small group tuition delivered by teachers & learning support assistants within and beyond the school day; employment of extra teacher time and learning support hours. Focus on teaching to gaps and giving feedback to move learning forward. (£47 000)

 

Impact on standards:

 

All disadvantaged children achieved the standard in the phonics screening assessment in Year 1 & Year 2;
Attainment overall for disadvantaged children in Year 2 was in line with disadvantaged children nationally and was similar to other pupils in the school in maths and at least the same or better compared to national attainment.

 

OFSTED’s analysis of data shows that outcomes for disadvantaged children at the end of Key Stage 2 is a strength of the school. Value added by the school in all subjects was at least average or better for disadvantaged pupils. Furthermore the progress made by disadvantaged children in reading, writing and maths was similar to the progress of other pupils nationally for at least 80% of the children.

 

  • Advice, training and specialist teacher sessions from the Specialist Teaching Service and educational psychologist; (£5000)

 

Impact: advice and support has enabled the school to improve the personalisation of learning for individuals. Learning sessions for individual children and training for support staff, which has been disseminated to colleagues has enabled pupils who were stuck or slow in their learning to move forward at a faster rate.

 

  • Overtime for support staff to attend training outside school hours; (£500)

 

Impact: improved understanding of children’ needs and how to address them has improved the quality of provision in the classes, both emotionally & academically.

 

  • Employment of school social worker (Faith in Families) to support the well being of pupils & their families; (£10 000)

Impact: this continues to be an invaluable resource. Feedback from families and the children is highly positive. Children are becoming more resilient and more able to apply coping strategies in difficult situations.

 

  • Purchase of ICT equipment & software to support learning; (£1 500)

 

Impact: Pupils have had an increased number of opportunities to use ICT for learning (including I-Pads/Kindles) both at school and at home. This motivational approach has enabled children to increase the pace of their progress.

 

  • Subsidising the cost of: school clubs, musical instrument lessons, activities, transport, trips, visitors to school and Y6 residential for low income families. (£8 750)

 

Impact: Pupils across the school have had opportunities to improve health and fitness and broaden their life experiences. This has also raised confidence and self-esteem for some pupils. Support with transport for some pupils has improved attendance and minimised gaps in learning.

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